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Agronomy Update September 2017

Posted on September 13, 2017

The Andersons Agronomy Update: September 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

TEST WEIGHT AND YIELD
During the month of September, conversations about yield and test weight are prevalent as harvest nears. It is often thought if the test weight is good, then the yield will be good. Or vice versa, if the test weight is low, then the yields will be down.

In reality, there is little correlation, and test weight is not a direct factor affecting yield. Yield is determined by the weight of individual kernels and how many kernels are produced per acre. Test weight is a volume measurement that allows us to determine what a bushel of corn weighs. We still measure yield in bushels per acre, but grain is sold and traded based on weight. Because we weigh grain instead of measuring its volume, the USDA has created a standard for trading, which is 56 pounds of grain to make a bushel of corn at 15.5% moisture. Test weight does not determine yield, but instead determines how much of that grain can fit into a certain space, such as a bin or a truck. The moisture aspect is important because test weight and moisture are directly correlated. Generally, as grain moisture goes down, test weight goes up.

There are other factors that influence test weight, including seed coat slickness, damage to kernels, and even plant genetics. Even though test weight is not a direct factor to yield, it is still an important part of crop production. Weather during this time of year can have a big impact on both yield and test weight as corn plants are moving closer to maturity. Visit the following links for more information on this topic:

Understanding Corn Test Weight by University of Wisconsin Extension
Making Sense of Corn Test Weight by DeKalb


MANAGEMENT
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


WINTER WHEAT

Winter wheat planting is just around the corner, and now is the time to finalize starter fertilizer programs. Applying fertilizer with the wheat seed at planting helps to increase root and shoot growth, allowing plants to build better energy reserves before entering dormancy. This allows plants to green up faster in the spring and produce more tillers.

The Andersons PureGrade® lineup has many formulations to fit specific fertility programs for liquid fertilizer users. If using dry fertilizer at planting, Humic DG™ dispersing granules may be applied with other dry fertilizer formulations with the seed. Humic DG dispersing granules feature dual carbon sources to increase the utilization of other applied fertilizer. If fertilizer is not going to be applied at planting, a foliar fertilizer application in the spring should be considered to increase growth after dormancy. For products and rates, click here or contact your sales representative. For additional information on winter wheat starter fertilizer:

Help Your Winter Wheat Outlast the Conditions by The Andersons
Top Reasons to Use Starter Fertilizer on Winter Wheat by The Andersons


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


When Season Pass® Plus with AVAIL® liquid starter was applied in-furrow at wheat planting at a rate of 5 gal/A, a yield increase of 5.5 bu/A was observed over an untreated check. When Phosfix® was applied as a foliar application at a rate of 1 pt/A in the spring, an even greater yield increase was observed – 9.6 bu/A. In addition to positive impacts on yield, the application of Season Pass Plus with AVAIL liquid starter and Phosfix resulted in significantly less lodging before harvest, compared to an untreated check.


 

The Andersons Agronomy Update: September 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

TEST WEIGHT AND YIELD
During the month of September, conversations about yield and test weight are prevalent as harvest nears. It is often thought if the test weight is good, then the yield will be good. Or vice versa, if the test weight is low, then the yields will be down.

In reality, there is little correlation, and test weight is not a direct factor affecting yield. Yield is determined by the weight of individual kernels and how many kernels are produced per acre. Test weight is a volume measurement that allows us to determine what a bushel of corn weighs. We still measure yield in bushels per acre, but grain is sold and traded based on weight. Because we weigh grain instead of measuring its volume, the USDA has created a standard for trading, which is 56 pounds of grain to make a bushel of corn at 15.5% moisture. Test weight does not determine yield, but instead determines how much of that grain can fit into a certain space, such as a bin or a truck. The moisture aspect is important because test weight and moisture are directly correlated. Generally, as grain moisture goes down, test weight goes up.

There are other factors that influence test weight, including seed coat slickness, damage to kernels, and even plant genetics. Even though test weight is not a direct factor to yield, it is still an important part of crop production. Weather during this time of year can have a big impact on both yield and test weight as corn plants are moving closer to maturity. Visit the following links for more information on this topic:

Understanding Corn Test Weight by Mike Rankin, Crops and Soils Agent
Making Sense of Corn Test Weight by AnyTimeAg.com


MANAGEMENT
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


WINTER WHEAT

Winter wheat planting is just around the corner, and now is the time to finalize starter fertilizer programs. Applying fertilizer with the wheat seed at planting helps to increase root and shoot growth, allowing plants to build better energy reserves before entering dormancy. This allows plants to green up faster in the spring and produce more tillers.

The Andersons PureGrade® lineup has many formulations to fit specific fertility programs for liquid fertilizer users. If using dry fertilizer at planting, Humic DG™ dispersing granules may be applied with other dry fertilizer formulations with the seed. Humic DG dispersing granules feature dual carbon sources to increase the utilization of other applied fertilizer. If fertilizer is not going to be applied at planting, a foliar fertilizer application in the spring should be considered to increase growth after dormancy. For products and rates, click here or contact your sales representative. For additional information on winter wheat starter fertilizer:

Help Your Winter Wheat Outlast the Conditions by The Andersons
Top Reasons to Use Starter Fertilizer on Winter Wheat by The Andersons


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


When Season Pass® Plus was applied in-furrow at wheat planting at a rate of 5 gal/A, a yield increase of 5.5 bu/A was observed over an untreated check. When Phosfix® was applied as a foliar application at a rate of 1 pt/A in the spring, an even greater yield increase was observed – 9.6 bu/A. In addition to positive impacts on yield, the application of Season Pass Plus and Phosfix resulted in significantly less lodging before harvest, compared to an untreated check.


Average Yield | Ohio 2016 Research Trial Average Lodging | Ohio 2016 Research Trial

The Andersons Agronomy Update: September 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

TEST WEIGHT AND YIELD
During the month of September, conversations about yield and test weight are prevalent as harvest nears. It is often thought if the test weight is good, then the yield will be good. Or vice versa, if the test weight is low, then the yields will be down.

In reality, there is little correlation, and test weight is not a direct factor affecting yield. Yield is determined by the weight of individual kernels and how many kernels are produced per acre. Test weight is a volume measurement that allows us to determine what a bushel of corn weighs. We still measure yield in bushels per acre, but grain is sold and traded based on weight. Because we weigh grain instead of measuring its volume, the USDA has created a standard for trading, which is 56 pounds of grain to make a bushel of corn at 15.5% moisture. Test weight does not determine yield, but instead determines how much of that grain can fit into a certain space, such as a bin or a truck. The moisture aspect is important because test weight and moisture are directly correlated. Generally, as grain moisture goes down, test weight goes up.

There are other factors that influence test weight, including seed coat slickness, damage to kernels, and even plant genetics. Even though test weight is not a direct factor to yield, it is still an important part of crop production. Weather during this time of year can have a big impact on both yield and test weight as corn plants are moving closer to maturity. Visit the following links for more information on this topic:

Understanding Corn Test Weight by Mike Rankin, Crops and Soils Agent
Making Sense of Corn Test Weight by AnyTimeAg.com


MANAGEMENT
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


WINTER WHEAT

Winter wheat planting is just around the corner, and now is the time to finalize starter fertilizer programs. Applying fertilizer with the wheat seed at planting helps to increase root and shoot growth, allowing plants to build better energy reserves before entering dormancy. This allows plants to green up faster in the spring and produce more tillers.

The Andersons PureGrade® lineup has many formulations to fit specific fertility programs for liquid fertilizer users. If using dry fertilizer at planting, Humic DG™ dispersing granules may be applied with other dry fertilizer formulations with the seed. Humic DG dispersing granules feature dual carbon sources to increase the utilization of other applied fertilizer. If fertilizer is not going to be applied at planting, a foliar fertilizer application in the spring should be considered to increase growth after dormancy. For products and rates, click here or contact your sales representative. For additional information on winter wheat starter fertilizer:

Help Your Winter Wheat Outlast the Conditions by The Andersons
Top Reasons to Use Starter Fertilizer on Winter Wheat by The Andersons


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


When Season Pass® Plus was applied in-furrow at wheat planting at a rate of 5 gal/A, a yield increase of 5.5 bu/A was observed over an untreated check. When Phosfix® was applied as a foliar application at a rate of 1 pt/A in the spring, an even greater yield increase was observed – 9.6 bu/A. In addition to positive impacts on yield, the application of Season Pass Plus and Phosfix resulted in significantly less lodging before harvest, compared to an untreated check.


 

The Andersons Agronomy Update: September 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

TEST WEIGHT AND YIELD
During the month of September, conversations about yield and test weight are prevalent as harvest nears. It is often thought if the test weight is good, then the yield will be good. Or vice versa, if the test weight is low, then the yields will be down.

In reality, there is little correlation, and test weight is not a direct factor affecting yield. Yield is determined by the weight of individual kernels and how many kernels are produced per acre. Test weight is a volume measurement that allows us to determine what a bushel of corn weighs. We still measure yield in bushels per acre, but grain is sold and traded based on weight. Because we weigh grain instead of measuring its volume, the USDA has created a standard for trading, which is 56 pounds of grain to make a bushel of corn at 15.5% moisture. Test weight does not determine yield, but instead determines how much of that grain can fit into a certain space, such as a bin or a truck. The moisture aspect is important because test weight and moisture are directly correlated. Generally, as grain moisture goes down, test weight goes up.

There are other factors that influence test weight, including seed coat slickness, damage to kernels, and even plant genetics. Even though test weight is not a direct factor to yield, it is still an important part of crop production. Weather during this time of year can have a big impact on both yield and test weight as corn plants are moving closer to maturity. Visit the following links for more information on this topic:

Understanding Corn Test Weight by Mike Rankin, Crops and Soils Agent
Making Sense of Corn Test Weight by AnyTimeAg.com


MANAGEMENT
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


WINTER WHEAT

Winter wheat planting is just around the corner, and now is the time to finalize starter fertilizer programs. Applying fertilizer with the wheat seed at planting helps to increase root and shoot growth, allowing plants to build better energy reserves before entering dormancy. This allows plants to green up faster in the spring and produce more tillers.

The Andersons PureGrade® lineup has many formulations to fit specific fertility programs for liquid fertilizer users. If using dry fertilizer at planting, Humic DG™ dispersing granules may be applied with other dry fertilizer formulations with the seed. Humic DG dispersing granules feature dual carbon sources to increase the utilization of other applied fertilizer. If fertilizer is not going to be applied at planting, a foliar fertilizer application in the spring should be considered to increase growth after dormancy. For products and rates, click here or contact your sales representative. For additional information on winter wheat starter fertilizer:

Help Your Winter Wheat Outlast the Conditions by The Andersons
Top Reasons to Use Starter Fertilizer on Winter Wheat by The Andersons


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


When Season Pass® Plus was applied in-furrow at wheat planting at a rate of 5 gal/A, a yield increase of 5.5 bu/A was observed over an untreated check. When Phosfix® was applied as a foliar application at a rate of 1 pt/A in the spring, an even greater yield increase was observed – 9.6 bu/A. In addition to positive impacts on yield, the application of Season Pass Plus and Phosfix resulted in significantly less lodging before harvest, compared to an untreated check.

Soft Red Winter Wheat Field

Soft red winter wheat from trial. Photo by: Amy Schroeder

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