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Agronomy Update August 2017

Posted on August 11, 2017

The Andersons Agronomy Update: August 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM
Western bean cutworm continues to be a concern as moth flight extended for up to 6 weeks in areas. Scouting should continue to occur as treatments are needed before the larvae reach the ear and are not subjected to contacting the insecticide. There is still time for yield loss to occur from this pest so it is important to do field checks to see if an insecticide application is needed. Overpass® CF or Super 72™ are good tank mix partners for this type of application. For more information on what factors to consider click here.


SOUTHERN RUST
Confirmed reports of southern rust continue to move farther north through corn growing regions and can now be found in 15 states as shown in Figure 1. Southern rust is a leaf disease that can significantly reduce yield. The potential for yield reduction is less of a concern when infected after the R3/Milk stage, so knowing the growth stage of the crop and the severity of infection, if any, is important so checking multiple locations within a field is critical. If an application is deemed necessary, many fungicides have both curative and preventative properties that can give 21 days of control. When trying to protect late season plant health, an application of slow release nitrogen along with a fungicide can prove beneficial.

Figure 1:

Figure 1: Southern Rust

Southern rust has been confirmed in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee and Texas. The map has been updated to include newly confirmed counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska. Yellow counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Tennessee are suspect fields that have been identified by industry sources but not yet confirmed by University/Extension sources. Source: iPiPE


SOYBEANS

SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME
This is the time of year when sudden death syndrome (SDS) starts to show up in soybeans. This disease infects plants early in the season especially when conditions are wet and cool. The symptoms start to show up during pod fill especially when conditions become wet or cool. So this could be a year for this disease to be widespread. When scouting, look for yellow spots on the upper leaves that will eventually turn brown as well as a brown to blue discoloration on the lower stem and upper roots. The leaf symptoms are shown in Figure 2. Foliar fungicides are not effective against SDS and the best management strategy is typically to plant resistant soybean varieties. It is important to take note of these areas of the field for future management to reduce yield loss down the road. For more information on sudden death syndrome from Pioneer click here.

Figure 2:

Figure 2: Sudden Death Syndrome


RESISTANT APHIDS
Mother Nature always seems to show us something different from one season to the next to keep us from becoming complacent. An example of that this year is increasing reports of pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids. The information shows that the area is limited to specific parts of North Dakota and Minnesota at this time. It is another reminder for the need to use different modes of action to minimize the potential for resistance, whether we are using insecticides, herbicides or fungicides. Click here for more information from the University of Minnesota Extension.


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


SOILS ARE TEEMING WITH LIFE
An often overlooked component of an agricultural field is the health of the soil. A healthy soil provides many benefits to our plants, including physical support, air, water, temperature moderation, protection from toxins and nutrients. Soil microorganisms play a huge role in soil health. Although we cannot see them and we rarely think about them, there are billions of microorganisms below our fields, as displayed in Figure 3. In one of my favorite books, The Biological Farmer, Gary Zimmer describes these as “a ‘voluntary army’ willing to work tirelessly for you, if only you will let them.” “If you provide them with a comfortable ‘home’ (soil with air and moisture), food (organic matter), a good mineral balance and freedom from toxic chemicals, they will go to work. If you feed the soil microbes, they will feed the crop.” Soil microorganisms have very important functions, including nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, nutrient availability, and soil structure promotion.

Figure 3:
Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Figure 3: Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Zimmer, Gary. The Biological Farmer. Austin: Acres U.S.A., 2017.


There are a few different soil tests that can give you a glimpse of the soil life in your field. One test that I like to perform on my research fields is called The Haney Soil Health Test, commonly referred to as The Haney Test. Rather than using harsh chemicals to determine the level of nutrients in soil, The Haney Test uses methods that mimic how nature extracts nutrients from the soil. The Haney Test assesses overall soil health and reports the amount of N, P and K available to the plants and microbes in your field (Figure 4). A large portion of these nutrients are not reported in standard soil testing, so by using The Haney Test you can reduce your inputs, protecting the environment and your wallet.

Figure 4:
Excerpt from The Haney Test Results

Figure 4: The Haney Test Results

The Haney Test Results – An excerpt. For a full example of a report, click here.


Also included in The Haney Test package is a test called the Solvita CO2 Burst Test. This test measures the activity of soil microorganisms by measuring the CO2 they produce. As mentioned above, these microbes play a critical role in supplying nitrogen and phosphorus to crops. Therefore, the results of this test should serve as a reliable index of the soil’s capacity to supply nitrogen and phosphorus to crops.

Consider these tests as you plan for your upcoming soil testing. If your test results indicate that your soils are in poor health, talk to your sales representative at The Andersons about how our line of humic acid-based products can improve your soil.


For more information on any of the topics above, contact us today!


Be sure to check back next month for the next edition of The Andersons Agronomy Update.

The Andersons Agronomy Update: August 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM
Western bean cutworm continues to be a concern as moth flight extended for up to 6 weeks in areas. Scouting should continue to occur as treatments are needed before the larvae reach the ear and are not subjected to contacting the insecticide. There is still time for yield loss to occur from this pest so it is important to do field checks to see if an insecticide application is needed. Overpass CF or Super 72 are good tank mix partners for this type of application. For more information on what factors to consider click here.


SOUTHERN RUST
Confirmed reports of southern rust continue to move farther north through corn growing regions and can now be found in 15 states as shown in Figure 1. Southern rust is a leaf disease that can significantly reduce yield. The potential for yield reduction is less of a concern when infected after the R3/Milk stage, so knowing the growth stage of the crop and the severity of infection, if any, is important so checking multiple locations within a field is critical. If an application is deemed necessary, many fungicides have both curative and preventative properties that can give 21 days of control. When trying to protect late season plant health, an application of slow release nitrogen along with a fungicide can prove beneficial.

Figure 1:

Figure 1: Southern Rust

Southern rust has been confirmed in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee and Texas. The map has been updated to include newly confirmed counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska. Yellow counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Tennessee are suspect fields that have been identified by industry sources but not yet confirmed by University/Extension sources. Source: iPiPE


SOYBEANS

SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME
This is the time of year when sudden death syndrome (SDS) starts to show up in soybeans. This disease infects plants early in the season especially when conditions are wet and cool. The symptoms start to show up during pod fill especially when conditions become wet or cool. So this could be a year for this disease to be widespread. When scouting, look for yellow spots on the upper leaves that will eventually turn brown as well as a brown to blue discoloration on the lower stem and upper roots. The leaf symptoms are shown in Figure 2. Foliar fungicides are not effective against SDS and the best management strategy is typically to plant resistant soybean varieties. It is important to take note of these areas of the field for future management to reduce yield loss down the road. For more information on sudden death syndrome from Pioneer click here.

Figure 2:

Figure 2: Sudden Death Syndrome


RESISTANT APHIDS
Mother Nature always seems to show us something different from one season to the next to keep us from becoming complacent. An example of that this year is increasing reports of pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids. The information shows that the area is limited to specific parts of North Dakota and Minnesota at this time. It is another reminder for the need to use different modes of action to minimize the potential for resistance, whether we are using insecticides, herbicides or fungicides. Click here for more information from the University of Minnesota Extension.


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


SOILS ARE TEEMING WITH LIFE
An often overlooked component of an agricultural field is the health of the soil. A healthy soil provides many benefits to our plants, including physical support, air, water, temperature moderation, protection from toxins and nutrients. Soil microorganisms play a huge role in soil health. Although we cannot see them and we rarely think about them, there are billions of microorganisms below our fields, as displayed in Figure 3. In one of my favorite books, The Biological Farmer, Gary Zimmer describes these as “a ‘voluntary army’ willing to work tirelessly for you, if only you will let them.” “If you provide them with a comfortable ‘home’ (soil with air and moisture), food (organic matter), a good mineral balance and freedom from toxic chemicals, they will go to work. If you feed the soil microbes, they will feed the crop.” Soil microorganisms have very important functions, including nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, nutrient availability, and soil structure promotion.

Figure 3:
Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Figure 3: Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Zimmer, Gary. The Biological Farmer. Austin: Acres U.S.A., 2017.


There are a few different soil tests that can give you a glimpse of the soil life in your field. One test that I like to perform on my research fields is called The Haney Soil Health Test, commonly referred to as The Haney Test. Rather than using harsh chemicals to determine the level of nutrients in soil, The Haney Test uses methods that mimic how nature extracts nutrients from the soil. The Haney Test assesses overall soil health and reports the amount of N, P and K available to the plants and microbes in your field (Figure 4). A large portion of these nutrients are not reported in standard soil testing, so by using The Haney Test you can reduce your inputs, protecting the environment and your wallet.

Figure 4:
Excerpt from The Haney Test Results

Figure 4: The Haney Test Results

The Haney Test Results – An excerpt. For a full example of a report, click here.


Also included in The Haney Test package is a test called the Solvita CO2 Burst Test. This test measures the activity of soil microorganisms by measuring the CO2 they produce. As mentioned above, these microbes play a critical role in supplying nitrogen and phosphorus to crops. Therefore, the results of this test should serve as a reliable index of the soil’s capacity to supply nitrogen and phosphorus to crops.

Consider these tests as you plan for your upcoming soil testing. If your test results indicate that your soils are in poor health, talk to your sales representative at The Andersons about how our line of humic acid-based products can improve your soil.


For more information on any of the topics above, contact us today!


Be sure to check back next month for the next edition of The Andersons Agronomy Update.

The Andersons Agronomy Update: August 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM
Western bean cutworm continues to be a concern as moth flight extended for up to 6 weeks in areas. Scouting should continue to occur as treatments are needed before the larvae reach the ear and are not subjected to contacting the insecticide. There is still time for yield loss to occur from this pest so it is important to do field checks to see if an insecticide application is needed. Overpass CF or Super 72 are good tank mix partners for this type of application. For more information on what factors to consider click here.


SOUTHERN RUST
Confirmed reports of southern rust continue to move farther north through corn growing regions and can now be found in 15 states as shown in Figure 1. Southern rust is a leaf disease that can significantly reduce yield. The potential for yield reduction is less of a concern when infected after the R3/Milk stage, so knowing the growth stage of the crop and the severity of infection, if any, is important so checking multiple locations within a field is critical. If an application is deemed necessary, many fungicides have both curative and preventative properties that can give 21 days of control. When trying to protect late season plant health, an application of slow release nitrogen along with a fungicide can prove beneficial.

Figure 1:

Figure 1: Southern Rust

Southern rust has been confirmed in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee and Texas. The map has been updated to include newly confirmed counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska. Yellow counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Tennessee are suspect fields that have been identified by industry sources but not yet confirmed by University/Extension sources. Source: iPiPE


SOYBEANS

SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME
This is the time of year when sudden death syndrome (SDS) starts to show up in soybeans. This disease infects plants early in the season especially when conditions are wet and cool. The symptoms start to show up during pod fill especially when conditions become wet or cool. So this could be a year for this disease to be widespread. When scouting, look for yellow spots on the upper leaves that will eventually turn brown as well as a brown to blue discoloration on the lower stem and upper roots. The leaf symptoms are shown in Figure 2. Foliar fungicides are not effective against SDS and the best management strategy is typically to plant resistant soybean varieties. It is important to take note of these areas of the field for future management to reduce yield loss down the road. For more information on sudden death syndrome from Pioneer click here.

Figure 2:

Figure 2: Sudden Death Syndrome


RESISTANT APHIDS
Mother Nature always seems to show us something different from one season to the next to keep us from becoming complacent. An example of that this year is increasing reports of pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids. The information shows that the area is limited to specific parts of North Dakota and Minnesota at this time. It is another reminder for the need to use different modes of action to minimize the potential for resistance, whether we are using insecticides, herbicides or fungicides. Click here for more information from the University of Minnesota Extension.


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


SOILS ARE TEEMING WITH LIFE
An often overlooked component of an agricultural field is the health of the soil. A healthy soil provides many benefits to our plants, including physical support, air, water, temperature moderation, protection from toxins and nutrients. Soil microorganisms play a huge role in soil health. Although we cannot see them and we rarely think about them, there are billions of microorganisms below our fields, as displayed in Figure 3. In one of my favorite books, The Biological Farmer, Gary Zimmer describes these as “a ‘voluntary army’ willing to work tirelessly for you, if only you will let them.” “If you provide them with a comfortable ‘home’ (soil with air and moisture), food (organic matter), a good mineral balance and freedom from toxic chemicals, they will go to work. If you feed the soil microbes, they will feed the crop.” Soil microorganisms have very important functions, including nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, nutrient availability, and soil structure promotion.

Figure 3:
Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Figure 3: Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Zimmer, Gary. The Biological Farmer. Austin: Acres U.S.A., 2017.


There are a few different soil tests that can give you a glimpse of the soil life in your field. One test that I like to perform on my research fields is called The Haney Soil Health Test, commonly referred to as The Haney Test. Rather than using harsh chemicals to determine the level of nutrients in soil, The Haney Test uses methods that mimic how nature extracts nutrients from the soil. The Haney Test assesses overall soil health and reports the amount of N, P and K available to the plants and microbes in your field (Figure 4). A large portion of these nutrients are not reported in standard soil testing, so by using The Haney Test you can reduce your inputs, protecting the environment and your wallet.

Figure 4:
Excerpt from The Haney Test Results

Figure 4: The Haney Test Results

The Haney Test Results – An excerpt. For a full example of a report, click here.


Also included in The Haney Test package is a test called the Solvita CO2 Burst Test. This test measures the activity of soil microorganisms by measuring the CO2 they produce. As mentioned above, these microbes play a critical role in supplying nitrogen and phosphorus to crops. Therefore, the results of this test should serve as a reliable index of the soil’s capacity to supply nitrogen and phosphorus to crops.

Consider these tests as you plan for your upcoming soil testing. If your test results indicate that your soils are in poor health, talk to your sales representative at The Andersons about how our line of humic acid-based products can improve your soil.


For more information on any of the topics above, contact us today!


Be sure to check back next month for the next edition of The Andersons Agronomy Update.

The Andersons Agronomy Update: August 2017


SCOUTING
By Brian Banks, Senior Agronomist


CORN

WESTERN BEAN CUTWORM
Western bean cutworm continues to be a concern as moth flight extended for up to 6 weeks in areas. Scouting should continue to occur as treatments are needed before the larvae reach the ear and are not subjected to contacting the insecticide. There is still time for yield loss to occur from this pest so it is important to do field checks to see if an insecticide application is needed. Overpass CF or Super 72 are good tank mix partners for this type of application. For more information on what factors to consider click here.


SOUTHERN RUST
Confirmed reports of southern rust continue to move farther north through corn growing regions and can now be found in 15 states as shown in Figure 1. Southern rust is a leaf disease that can significantly reduce yield. The potential for yield reduction is less of a concern when infected after the R3/Milk stage, so knowing the growth stage of the crop and the severity of infection, if any, is important so checking multiple locations within a field is critical. If an application is deemed necessary, many fungicides have both curative and preventative properties that can give 21 days of control. When trying to protect late season plant health, an application of slow release nitrogen along with a fungicide can prove beneficial.

Figure 1:

Figure 1: Southern Rust

Southern rust has been confirmed in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Tennessee and Texas. The map has been updated to include newly confirmed counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Nebraska. Yellow counties in Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Tennessee are suspect fields that have been identified by industry sources but not yet confirmed by University/Extension sources. Source: iPiPE


SOYBEANS

SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME
This is the time of year when sudden death syndrome (SDS) starts to show up in soybeans. This disease infects plants early in the season especially when conditions are wet and cool. The symptoms start to show up during pod fill especially when conditions become wet or cool. So this could be a year for this disease to be widespread. When scouting, look for yellow spots on the upper leaves that will eventually turn brown as well as a brown to blue discoloration on the lower stem and upper roots. The leaf symptoms are shown in Figure 2. Foliar fungicides are not effective against SDS and the best management strategy is typically to plant resistant soybean varieties. It is important to take note of these areas of the field for future management to reduce yield loss down the road. For more information on sudden death syndrome from Pioneer click here.

Figure 2:

Figure 2: Sudden Death Syndrome


RESISTANT APHIDS
Mother Nature always seems to show us something different from one season to the next to keep us from becoming complacent. An example of that this year is increasing reports of pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids. The information shows that the area is limited to specific parts of North Dakota and Minnesota at this time. It is another reminder for the need to use different modes of action to minimize the potential for resistance, whether we are using insecticides, herbicides or fungicides. Click here for more information from the University of Minnesota Extension.


RESEARCH
By Amy Schroeder, Research Agronomist


SOILS ARE TEEMING WITH LIFE
An often overlooked component of an agricultural field is the health of the soil. A healthy soil provides many benefits to our plants, including physical support, air, water, temperature moderation, protection from toxins and nutrients. Soil microorganisms play a huge role in soil health. Although we cannot see them and we rarely think about them, there are billions of microorganisms below our fields, as displayed in Figure 3. In one of my favorite books, The Biological Farmer, Gary Zimmer describes these as “a ‘voluntary army’ willing to work tirelessly for you, if only you will let them.” “If you provide them with a comfortable ‘home’ (soil with air and moisture), food (organic matter), a good mineral balance and freedom from toxic chemicals, they will go to work. If you feed the soil microbes, they will feed the crop.” Soil microorganisms have very important functions, including nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, nutrient availability, and soil structure promotion.

Figure 3:
Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Figure 3: Populations of soil organisms commonly found in the surface of most soils

Zimmer, Gary. The Biological Farmer. Austin: Acres U.S.A., 2017.


There are a few different soil tests that can give you a glimpse of the soil life in your field. One test that I like to perform on my research fields is called The Haney Soil Health Test, commonly referred to as The Haney Test. Rather than using harsh chemicals to determine the level of nutrients in soil, The Haney Test uses methods that mimic how nature extracts nutrients from the soil. The Haney Test assesses overall soil health and reports the amount of N, P and K available to the plants and microbes in your field (Figure 4). A large portion of these nutrients are not reported in standard soil testing, so by using The Haney Test you can reduce your inputs, protecting the environment and your wallet.

Figure 4:
Excerpt from The Haney Test Results

Figure 4: The Haney Test Results

The Haney Test Results – An excerpt. For a full example of a report, click here.


Also included in The Haney Test package is a test called the Solvita CO2 Burst Test. This test measures the activity of soil microorganisms by measuring the CO2 they produce. As mentioned above, these microbes play a critical role in supplying nitrogen and phosphorus to crops. Therefore, the results of this test should serve as a reliable index of the soil’s capacity to supply nitrogen and phosphorus to crops.

Consider these tests as you plan for your upcoming soil testing. If your test results indicate that your soils are in poor health, talk to your sales representative at The Andersons about how our line of humic acid-based products can improve your soil.


For more information on any of the topics above, contact us today!


Be sure to check back next month for the next edition of The Andersons Agronomy Update.

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